Posted in 13th Century Guest Post

A. E. Chandler on The Scarlet Forest: A Tale of Robin Hood

Historical-FIction.com welcomes author A. E. Chandler with an article on her novel based on the story of Robin Hood, The Scarlet Forest. Fans of the legend shouldn’t miss this retelling! Read on for more details. Chandler: At four years old, I first saw the Disney cartoon movie of Robin Hood, and since then he has been one of my heroes. As a Medieval Studies grad student at the University of Nottingham, I took history and archaeology, as well as Middle English language and literature courses, with the goal of writing a well-rounded dissertation on the social history behind an early to mid-thirteenth century Robin Hood figure. Studying at Nottingham was an amazing opportunity to pick the brains of a number of expert medievalists, gain access…

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Posted in 13th Century Reviews

review: The Sister Queens

The Sister Queens by Sophie Perinot In the thirteenth century the Count and Countess of Provence produced four beautiful daughters. Though all married into either France or England and became Queens, the two eldest–Marguerite and Eleanor–were noted for their sisterly devotion, which would ultimately lead to the Treaty of Paris in later years. Marguerite, the eldest and first to marry, set forth to France with pleasant reports of King Louis IX, her betrothed, but unwittingly walked into a court where the Queen Mother, Blanche of Castile, reigned and would spend many years fighting “the dragon” for her place. Louis was exceptionally devoted to first religion and second to his mother, the White Queen. At first the marriage was successful and Marguerite excelled at swallowing her…

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Posted in 12th Century 13th Century Reviews

review: The Scarlet Lion

review: The Scarlet Lion by Elizabeth Chadwick Being the sequel to The Greatest Knight, this novel covers the life of William Marshal, Earl of Pembroke from 1197 to shortly after his death in 1219. While his wife, Isabelle, is busy giving birth to the rest of their ten children, William is settling their estates in Normandy and trying to step lightly in the court of the newly crowned King John. King John has a personality complex best described as pleasantly evil—honeyed words with subtle warnings. He sees William as reaching and ambitious, though deep down he knows he is trustworthy. Even so, John will not make the way easy for him. William treads softly, ever the diplomat and courtier, for the sake of his dynasty….

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