Posted in Author Interview Biblical

Interview with India Edghill

Do you find the people who lived in Biblical times have a lot in common with us today? How are our lives similar? That’s one of those questions to which I think the answer is both “yes” and “no”. People seem to come in the same set of types no matter when they live. (No matter what group — political, fannish, whatever — they’re in, come to that. There’s the Person Who Thinks He Does Everything. There’s the Person Who Really Does All The Work. There’s the Person Who’s In It For the Shopping Ops. And so on…) I think that the average person in any time period works hard and tries to live a decent life and provide for a better life for his…

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Posted in 18th Century Author Interview French Revolution

author interview: Sally Christie on The Enemies of Versailles

Author Sally Christie has answered a few questions on her last novel, The Enemies of Versailles. You can read my reviews of all three books in the trilogy at the following links: The Sisters of Versailles The Rivals of Versailles The Enemies of Versailles When you began writing this series, did you realize you’d be writing about so many women or did you discover them while researching? I actually didn’t set out to write a series – I just wrote the story of the Mailly Nesle sisters (from The Sisters of Versailles) and wasn’t even considering Louis XV’s later mistresses, as I assumed Madame de Pompadour and the Comtesse du Barry would have had a lot of fiction written about them. When I discovered that…

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Posted in Author Interview Non-Fiction

author interview: Leslie Carroll on Notorious Royal Marriages

1. There are more than 50 books and 20 articles cited as sources for Notorious Royal Marriages. The research involved is mind boggling, though you have written and published two non-fiction books. What is your typical schedule when researching and writing? Do you research as you go? First Arleigh, I’d like to say thanks so much for this interview. I’m delighted to visit Historical-fiction.com. And these are wonderful questions! I do indeed research as I go, chapter by chapter and subject by subject; although I don’t necessarily write the chapters in the chronological order in which they appear in the book. Often I’ll start with the books I already own on a given person; consequently, those are the chapters that get written first. That said,…

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Posted in 19th Century 20th Century Author Interview Belle Époque Victorian

author interview: Robert Stephen Parry on The Hours Before

Author Interview: ROBERT STEPHEN PARRY The Hours Before begins with an interesting character perspective. Can you explain why you chose this path for the introduction? Perhaps one of the easiest mistakes we can make in life (and the more successful, wealthy or comfortable one becomes the easier it is to make it) is to assume that humility and modesty are indications of inferiority in those we encounter – when in fact they can be, and often are, just the opposite. The world’s great religions, and even many of our most popular stories and myths teach us this. I have always been fascinated by the scenario outlined in the Bhagavad Gita – the Hindu spiritual classic – in which, on the eve of battle, the hero…

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Posted in 20th Century Author Interview WWII

author interview: Margaret Wurtele

“A young Italian woman risks her life to defy the injustice surrounding her in Margaret Wurtele’s The Golden Hour, a touching novel of forbidden love in war-torn Italy… It is autumn 1943 when German forces invade the peaceful vineyards and olive groves of Giovanna Bellini’s village in Tuscany. At first, the seventeen-year-old finds herself fascinated by the dashing Nazi officers. She has yet to come face-to-face with the harsh realities of war. Her life changes when her brother joins the partisans and recruits her to smuggle food. What begins as a lark takes a drastic turn when she’s asked to hide a wounded freedom fighter, for Mario Rava is not just a partisan–he’s also a Jew. As Giovanna helps Mario heal, their bond deepens. But…

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Posted in 19th Century Author Interview Victorian

author interview: Robert Stephen Parry on The Arrow Chest

1. Many reviewers have called The Arrow Chest hauntingly beautiful–which is true–but the supernatural elements are so subtle that only those well-versed in Tudor history see the glaring similarities between Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn, and Oliver Ramsey and Daphne. Firstly, I applaud you for not making it sickening obvious; my question is: did you begin writing with the idea of blending histories or did it piece together as you were writing? The structure was set out way before the writing began in earnest. So yes the question, as you suggest, was always going to be just how much should the Tudor other-worldliness impinge on the Victorian reality in which the story itself is set? It’s all about striking the right balance. If it’s too…

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Posted in Author Interview

author interview: Ginger Myrick on Work of Art

Work of Art: Love and Murder in 19th Century New York by Ginger Myrick Work of Art is set in the late 19th century in Five Points, New York City. How did you choose the era and setting for this novel? I suppose I was drawn to this era because some of my favorite classic books are set during the late 19th century: Tess of the D’Urbervilles, Anna Karenina, The Age of Innocence … I knew I wanted to set the book on the east coast of the US, after the war and in a city with a large Irish community. I also have a slight obsession with Jack the Ripper, and I guess my subconscious mind chose a time period that would allow me…

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Posted in Author Interview

author interview: Ginger Myrick on The Welsh Healer

Author Ginger Myrick has answered some questions regarding her latest novel, The Welsh Healer. If you read my review, you will know the background of this book and why it is special to me. I may be biased, but this is truly great historical fiction set in an era that’s used considerably less than the popular Tudor era, though it does lead up to the Welsh born Henry VII. If you’re a fan of Jean Plaidy or Anya Seton, you will love Ginger Myrick’s writing! How did you feel about adding a little magic into your latest historical novel? Did you have any misgivings about the reactions of your readers? Actually, the thought never entered my mind! I can be extremely dense sometimes, and rarely…

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Posted in Author Interview

author interview: Ginger Myrick

First of all, I must ask…is it your dog(s), or at least the breed, we read of in the story? Do they have a special history with the island of Terceira or other settings from the book? Actually, my dog is a Labradoodle (half Labrador Retriever and half Poodle) basically a glorified mutt, but I love him! When I decided that I wanted to include him in the book, I tried to figure out which combination of the native breeds would most closely approximate the mix. I think the Portuguese Water Dog, or Cão de Água, was pretty common on the ships of that era, and there is a breed of dog, Cão de Fila de São Miguel, that actually originated in the Azores specifically…

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Posted in Author Interview

author interview: Juliet Grey

Inspired by her latest novel, DAYS OF SPLENDOR, DAYS OF SORROW, I posed these questions to the author, Juliet Grey, on writing and the French Revolution. If you haven’t picked up this novel yet, I highly recommend it (along with the first novel in the series, BECOMING MARIE ANTOINETTE). Did you find the writing easier, harder or much the same between Becoming Marie Antoinette and Days of Splendor, Days of Sorrow? BECOMING MARIE ANTOINETTE had a more straightforward plot than DAYS OF SPLENDOR, DAYS OF SORROW. It was a coming of age story, which spanned fewer years in the life of Marie Antoinette. DAYS OF SPLENDOR, DAYS OF SORROW covered fifteen years of her reign and highlighted many seminal events that she was either not…

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Posted in Author Interview

author interview: Gary Inbinder

In venturing outside my usual genre I have discovered several great reads lately, including this one—Confessions of the Creature by Gary Inbinder, which is a continuation of Mary Shelley’s classic,Frankenstein. The creature has exacted revenge on his creator, retreated into the wilds of Russia and later finds himself transforming from monster to man. He rejoins society and moves up the ranks, becoming a military hero and gentleman. This novel is about a monster turned man, trying to understand and thrive in society, all the while suppressing the monster within. After finishing this beautifully crafted story, I sought out the author and asked him to answer a few questions, which you will find below. You can read my full review in Historical Novels Review’s August 2012…

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Posted in Arthurian Author Interview

author interview: Anna Elliott

You previously revealed that the inspiration for your Avalon series came in a dream. Have you always had an inclination for writing or is it a newfound passion? Oh, yes, I’ve been writing stories all my life, though only seriously pursuing novel writing since college. I’d written several books, but had almost given up on seeing any of them published when I had the dream that inspired me to write Twilight of Avalon. Other than Arthurian legends, what historical topics or eras intrigue you? Gosh, I almost can’t think of any historical eras that don’t intrigue me! I just history, love learning about the details of daily life in past eras and cultures. I’m especially fascinated my Ancient Egypt and the Victorian era, if I…

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