Posted in 18th Century Georgian England Reviews

review: The Prince and the Quakeress

The Prince and the Quakeress Fourth Book in the Georgian Saga by Jean Plaidy This is the story of the young George III, when he was not yet considered significant—only the eldest son of the Prince of Wales, Frederick, and grandson of King George II. If you’re not familiar with England’s King Georges’, you may find parts of the story hard to follow, as it alludes to characters from the previous books in the Georgian series, Queen in Waiting and Caroline the Queen. Old King George II is in his winter years, bad tempered and constantly lamenting his deceased wife, Queen Caroline, whom he reveres more in death than he did in life. At the forefront is Frederick, Prince of Wales, his wife Augusta, and…

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Posted in 18th Century Georgian England Reviews

review: Perdita’s Prince

Perdita’s Prince Georgian Saga #6 by Jean Plaidy This installment of Plaidy’s Georgian Saga comes directly after The Third George and begins with the Prince of Wales’ coming-of-age. At seventeen he is still kept under lock and key, the king controlling his life down to the food he is allowed. When given an inch of freedom, young George runs head-first into debauchery, finding–to the King’s horror–friends in the enemy camp, Charles James Fox, Uncle Cumberland, and anyone of the Whig political party. He sets up an actress as his mistress and lives, purposely, a completely opposite lifestyle from the King. Perdita is Mary Robinson’s part in Shakespeare’s play, The Winter’s Tale, in which the King had decided to make a rare appearance with his heir….

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Posted in 18th Century Georgian England Reviews

review: Wildish

Wildish by Robert Stephen Parry Set in Georgian England during the Jacobite Uprising of 1745, this is the story of Matthew Wildish, Master Wig Maker, socialite and something of a ladies’ man. Though he is not a titled gentleman, he moves in the most elite circles and has befriended many people in high places, however is still in the unique position of mixing with those of lower classes as well. This distinction serves him well in many facets, as one of his side-jobs consists of passing along information on those who may be a threat to the Hanoverian King George II. Matthew, with a little prompting from his muse, Johanna, begins working on a set of poems that will represent the seven celestial bodies (The…

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