Posted in Non-Fiction Regency Reviews

review: Georgette Heyer’s Regency World

Georgette Heyer’s Regency World by Jennifer Kloester Whether you’ve read Georgette Heyer or not–or even if you don’t plan to–this book is an enlightening read for history enthusiasts or those simply wishing to learn more about the Regency era. Heyer’s novels are referred to throughout, but with plenty of details as to how they relate to the facts and information presented. Heyer fans will enjoy learning the minute details, such as the jargon or illustrations of fashion and other items spoken of (but perhaps not described in detail) in the novels. I have only read a few of her novels: Powder and Patch, An Infamous Army and Cotillion, though I own about 8 more that I plan to read at some point. A handy feature…

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Posted in 19th Century Austen Regency Reviews

review: Darcy and Fitzwilliam

Darcy and Fitzwilliam A Tale of a Gentleman and an Officer by Karen V. Wasylowski This Austen continuation explores the first years of Darcy’s marriage, while Colonel Fitzwilliam searches for happiness after the horrors of Waterloo. Lady Catherine de Bourge plays a large part in this novel, though curiously not as the antagonist–that role is given over to Caroline Bingley, who continues to abuse Elizabeth even after she becomes Mrs. Darcy. While the story line is not too imaginative, the dialog between the characters is laugh-out-loud funny. I found the first part of the book to be charming and very readable, even if unbelievable at times. Unfortunately, the second half of the book was full of repetitive misunderstandings and maddening bullheadedness. The author definitely has…

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Posted in Regency Reviews

review: The Rules of Gentility

The Rules of Gentility by Janet Mullany Georgette Heyer’s Cotillionmeets Bridget Jones’ Diary–this highly entertaining regency novel is a delight from start to finish! Author Janet Mullany began writing this book as a personal project, but it grew into a full-fledged book, and I am happy to have spent a day and a half in the world of Philomena Wellesley-Clegg and Inigo Linsley (which is quick reading for me)! While Philomena is busy making lists, looking for a husband and shopping for bonnets, Inigo waltzes into the mix and upsets all of her plans. When things going awry, they conspire to alter outward appearances, all the while falling for each other no matter how much they strive otherwise. Secrets abound within their group of acquaintances,…

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Posted in Regency Reviews

review: Desperate Measures

Desperate Measures: A Regency Short Story by Candice Hern Though this is not my usual genre, I do have a fondness for all things Regency, and so I decided to download the eBook and give it a try. This short story relates a scene from a single evening at a dance, introducing two main characters and a handful of background characters, including an older brother and his mischievous friend, a mother scheming for her daughter’s marriage prospects, and a notorious womanizer pitted against a true gentleman—the object of the protagonist’s affection. While it is humorous and entertaining, it does begin to overstep the boundary that separates historical fiction from historical romance, but is a great diversion for Georgette Heyer fans looking for similar reads. The…

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Posted in Austen Non-Fiction Regency Reviews

review: Behind Jane Austen’s Door

Behind Jane Austen’s Door by Jennifer Forest You can read scores of Regency novels and never quite know the proper etiquette for visiting, or the hierarchy of social classes and what is expected of each. You see the romantic and gentlemanly side of the characters, but never the societal rules governing who can speak to whom, and who you should (or shouldn’t) want to make a connection with. Each room of the house has its purpose and uses; Each has a set of tasks, if any, that are acceptable within that sphere. With quotes from Jane Austen’s letters to her sister, Cassandra, and from her novels, the author explains the ins and outs of the Regency home and the social customs surrounding it. The making…

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Posted in 19th Century Austen Regency Reviews

review: Longbourn by Jo Baker

Longbourn by Jo Baker Pride and Prejudice through the servants’ eyes—this is the story of the life of Sarah, the maid in charge of the laundry and other various chores of the Bennet household, coinciding with the events from Austen’s original. Sarah began as an orphan from the ‘poorhouse’, taken under Mrs. Hill’s wing and raised at Longbourn. Of an age with Elizabeth, she most closely relates to the second daughter, though the difference in position between the Bennet sisters and the maid is starkly portrayed. Sarah spends a good amount of time resenting her duties while the daughters of the house thoughtlessly soil their clothes and shoes, discarding them without realizing the time and effort required to clean them. Sarah has two love interests;…

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Posted in 18th Century Austen Regency Reviews

review: Darcy’s Story

Darcy’s Story by Janet Aylmer This is the story of Jane Austen’s Pride & Prejudice as related by the character of Mr. Darcy—nothing new to the incredibly prolific sub-genre of Austen variations, but possibly one of the first printed, as it came out in 1996, shortly after the popular mini-series featuring Colin Firth and Jennifer Ehle. True to Austen’s characters and timeline, it is simply the events as Darcy lived them, with a generous amount of actual dialog from the original. Darcy, at first, is unaware of his offensive behavior, and until his confrontation with Elizabeth Bennet at Rosings, when he asks for her hand in marriage and is thoroughly rejected, he had never thought of his attitude in a negative light. Growing up an…

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