Posted in 19th Century 20th Century America Southern Fiction

Southern Historical Novels by Steven D. Ayres

Fallow Are the Fields This is an American Civil War novel, about young Steven Jett, his four older brothers, sister, mother and father, living on a small farm near Salt Springs, Georgia, just west of Atlanta in the middle 1800’s. From humble beginnings, this story takes you on a real life adventure, as the great war ravages across the country-side of North Georgia and changes the lives of these and all Americans forever. We Danced Until Dawn We Danced Until Dawn is the sequel to the l800’s family saga of Fallow Are the Fields. After the tragic and triumphant end of the American Civil War, a new beginning took hold all across America and changed the lives of Steven Jett and his family once again….

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Posted in Author Guest Post Southern Fiction

author guest post: Ann Hite

A Grandmother’s View of the South During the Great Depression The seeds for Ghost On Black Mountain were sown early in my life from stories told by my grandmother, Inas Hawkins Lord, and her sisters. We spent every Sunday afternoon in the high-ceiling living room of Great Aunt Stella’s house. A free-standing coal-burning stove stood in the center. In the winter Aunt Stella, two other sisters, her daughters, their daughters, my grandmother, and me pulled our chairs close. The women spent the afternoon talking. I listened. If I remained quiet and still, they forgot I was in the room and told the real stories of the times when life in the South was lean and brutal, especially if you were a woman on your own….

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Posted in 20th Century America Reviews Southern Fiction

review: Page from a Tennessee Journal

Page from a Tennessee Journal by Francine Thomas Howard Tennessee, 1913. Annalaura Wells is struggling to feed her four children after her husband takes their money and leaves without a word. Months pass as the family desperately tries to work their sharecropped tobacco farm. A bad harvest, combined with less hands to work the land bring trouble when the landowner, Alexander McNaughton, discovers the situation. His interest in Annalaura, however, trumps the lost profit on the crop and she finds she has no choice but to give in to his demands if she is to provide for her children. Meanwhile, John Wells is making a tidy sum working a poker game in Nashville. Though his true desires and intentions are lost on Annalaura, he eventually…

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