Posted in 16th Century Non-Fiction Reviews Tudor

review: The Fall of Anne Boleyn

The Fall of Anne Boleyn by Claire Ridgway A timeline of the final days of this controversial Queen of England, The Fall of Anne Boleyn recreates those harrowing months in 1536, with firsthand accounts, official documents and records, and court gossip. Though offering opinion here and there, many points of view are expressed from various biographers, and so there is representation from numerous sources. Veteran Tudor readers will not find much fresh information, though the format, being a day-to-day account of events, gives an easy to follow play-by-play of each accused person’s actions, beginning with his origins and introduction to court and the queen. Other key characters are also featured, with a clear understanding of his or her service (or disservice) in the royal court—most…

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Posted in 16th Century Non-Fiction Reviews Tudor

review: The Anne Boleyn Collection

The Anne Boleyn Collection by Claire Ridgway This book reads like a collection of essays and may be blog posts from The Anne Boleyn Files—I’m not familiar enough with the website to know if this is the case. It is arranged in an easy to follow style with the purpose of bringing some of the most valid arguments forward regarding Anne Boleyn’s guilt or innocence and relating information on the people around her. Citing all sources and even making points about the sources themselves, the author digs into previously uncharted footnotes of history, such as the mysterious graves belonging to Anne Boleyn’s alleged brothers who died young, and the disease that many believe King Henry VIII suffered from. As with the author’s other book, The…

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