Posted in Articles

Mothers in Literature: HF Version

In celebration of Mother’s Day, I have selected three mothers from literature I have read, each decidedly different from the other. We have an exemplary step-mother of ten, a well-intentioned, but delusional doting mother of five, and a grandmother bent on scheming and revenge. The latter may not be what’s expected of a holiday post, but let’s be honest: in fiction, there are very few protagonists with perfect parents. In fact, it’s fairly common for writers to use a dysfunctional home life as the catalyst for interesting characterizations. Along with the social team at RedEnvelope (who were an inspiration in writing this post), to my own mother, Carol, who instilled in me a love of reading, I dedicate the following trio: mother, step-mother and grandmother,…

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Posted in 19th Century America Reviews

review: To See Your Face Again

To See Your Face Again 2nd in the Savannah Quartet by Eugenia Price In this second installment of the Savannah Quartet by Eugenia Price, set more than a decade later, we follow Natalie Browning from a shipwreck in the Atlantic to the wilds of northwest Georgia. Mark and Caroline Browning, Eliza Mackay and her brood, Osmund Kott and many other characters make an appearance, as well as new faces on the trip to Cass County, Georgia. Natalie, a strong-willed, spoiled 16-year-old, meets and falls in love with the only man who has ever rebuffed her affections—Burke Latimer, a master carpenter who has just lost everything aboard the sinking ship. He leaves her in the care of a North Carolina gentleman and takes off to rebuild…

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Posted in 19th Century America Reviews

review: Savannah

Savannah by Eugenia Price Beginning a sweeping four book saga, Savannah introduces Mark Browning as a surprising protagonist–young, educated, privileged, and who, despite his upbringing and inheritance, is down-to-earth, monetarily savvy and eagerly looking for a place to call home. This he finds when he decides to leave his life in Philadelphia and start over in the city of his mother’s birth, and in which his late father had revered: Savannah, Georgia. On the voyage to Savannah, Mark meets the man who would become his confidante and mentor, Robert Mackay, a prominent Savannah businessman. Mackay and his wife Eliza–who are in fact based on real people–immediately take Mark into their care, becoming the family he’d always craved and setting the foundation of this entire book…

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